The Pink Pail
colored pencil on archival craft
20x16in framed

 

Colorado Blue Columbine
colored pencil on paper

Purple Poppy Mallow
24x18in framed

Englemann's Daisy
 

The Dance
16x20in framed

Hanging On
16x20in framed

Party In The Back
8x8in

Catalpa leaves, seeds, flowers. Series of 4, 20x20in. colored pencil on paper
 

Allium Sativum
7x5in

 

Catalpa leaves, graphite
 

Catkins, Pussy Willow
20x16in framed

 

Cottonwood
colored pencil on paper. each framed20x16in

 

Anemone
8x8in
colored pencil on paper

 

Tomatilla
16x20in framed
colored pencil on paper

 

Anemone
8x8in
colored pencil on paper

 

Nasturtium drawings are all colored pencil on paper.

Entire contents of this web site ©jeanne benson studio, all rights  reserved.

You need written permission to use images in anyway.

Nasturtiums: seed pods, leaves, flowers framed as one piece 28x34in

 8x8's below are made on paper and mounted on cradleboard.

View of Longs Peak
and Meeker


 

The Quilting Bee

 

Final Approach

 

A child and a wolf? The two on my mind the most during COVID-19, my grandchildren and hunger.
 

Ready
colored pencil on archival craft
24x18in framed

 

The Wolf is at the Door
colored pencil on bristol vellum
24x18in framed


 

While researching recipes for my series of recipe quilts, I found the author MFK Fisher.  Her book How To Cook A Wolf was published in 1942 at a time when wartime shortages were at their worst. She wrote to the home cooks facing shortages and blackouts. She encouraged them to focus on what they had and not on what they were missing. She offered substitutions, inspired them to be creative, to experiment (this where her humor comes through). Her thoughts about providing sustenance were more than just about putting food on the table but rather about making a delicious meal, gathering your people, and offering comfort. The second part of this equation eludes us during COVID-19. I was reminded of her words when I saw the lines of cars on the news of families picking up boxes of food. The wolf was ever in my thoughts. I found a photo of a wolf by Dave Kettering that was used in an article about the fate of the grey wolf in Colorado. I wrote to Dave with my idea for a drawing. He said sure. The wolf appears to begin to leave but turns back. Will he go or will he stay? Then you realize he is there always.

How To Cook A Wolf begins with an excerpt from a poem written during WWI by Charlotte Perkins Gilman.

There's a whining at the threshold—
There's a scratching at the door—
To work! To work! In Heaven's name!
The wolf is at the door!




 

Entire contents of this web site ©jeanne benson studio, all rights  reserved.

You need written permission to use images in anyway.